Addiction Policy Forum Blog

5 min read

Smoking will kill you, but first, it will accelerate the aging process

By Mark Gold, MD on September 5, 2019

Scientists and the general public have been aware of the harmful effects of tobacco for years now, recognizing its links to cardiovascular problems, cancer, and an array of other serious health problems. The Centers for Disease Control states that cigarette smoking accounts for over 480,000 deaths every year in the United States, and seven million deaths worldwide annually, which makes smoking the leading cause of preventable death in the world.1 Of those 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, the CDC includes more than 41,000 deaths resulting from secondhand smoke exposure. Secondhand smoke can cause or worsen a wide range of damaging health effects in children and adults, including lung cancer, respiratory infections and asthma. Scientists have concluded that the only real difference between first and secondhand smoke is consent. Children and others exposed to secondhand smoke suffer the same consequences but did not intend to smoke at all.2 In toto, cigarette smoking results in one in five deaths annually, or 1,300 deaths every day. On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers. 

Unfortunately for individuals who are smoking or exposed to cigarettes, new research indicates that tobacco use contributes to yet another health problem: biological aging. Previously, studies on the effects of tobacco use on aging have been fairly limited in their conclusions, but in recent years researchers have focused more on the question, applying new scientific tools in their work. One recent study, by Mamoshina et. al., used artificial intelligence to analyze blood and cell counts of smokers and non-smokers and to measure how much tobacco use aged smokers.

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2 min read

Addiction Policy Forum Launches Online School to Educate Americans About Addiction

By Addiction Policy Forum on September 3, 2019

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6 min read

Now What? THC Exposure and the Adolescent Brain

By Mark Gold, MD on August 29, 2019

As more states move to decriminalize or legalize marijuana and THC-related products, researching potential harms associated with cannabis use is an even more important field of study. In certain cases, such as marijuana-related medications, there is sound evidence. Usually, the manufacturer of a drug has to do clinical trials, called FDA trials, to demonstrate dose, safety, and efficacy for a particular problem or illness. The FDA did approve the first drug comprised of an active ingredient derived from marijuana to treat rare, severe forms of epilepsy. This was a well-conceived and logical trial and process. It resulted in the approval of Epidiolex (cannabidiol, or CBD) oral solution for the treatment of seizures associated with two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome, in patients two years of age and older. This was the first FDA-approved drug that contains a purified drug substance derived from marijuana. It was also the first FDA approval of a drug for the treatment of patients with Dravet syndrome. Notably, however, the FDA did not approve a crude plant or marijuana, but CBD. CBD does not cause intoxication or euphoria, the “high” that comes from marijuana’s tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In this case, we know that the medication is safe, we know its formulation and composition, and we know the dose. We also know that before this treatment, there were no good alternatives.

According to pediatricians and research scientists, there’s no scientific evidence supporting the acceptability of adolescent marijuana use, and products sold in dispensaries pose considerable risks to children and teens.1 The situation with cannabis, vaping THC, and other preparations is considerably different from that of an FDA-approved medication. In these cases, sadly, we are doing the research after the fact. We know that laws are meant to prevent children from using and smoking marijuana, but the public appears confused about safety warnings when children and adolescents seem like they are safely given cannabis for seizures. Recent data shows that use is increasing among young people. A SAMHSA report found that marijuana is teens’ most widely used illicit drug.2 Frequent marijuana use, in both youth (aged 12-17 years) and young adults, appears to be associated with risk for opioid use, heavy alcohol use, and major depressive episodes. Youth have access to the legal cannabis and related product markets, as well as the thriving illicit marketplace for drugs. Health problems linked to vaping may be in the headlines, as many of those with reported lung damage have vaped THC, but it is not the only problem facing teen users.3 

What does the latest research tell us about the effects of cannabis on the adolescent brain, and do we know enough to make recommendations? 

Science has not shown that cannabis is performance-enhancing like amphetamines, psychostimulants, or medications like methylphenidate given to people with learning problems. Research has clearly shown that adult cannabis use can affect a person’s memory, performance and ability to learn. Recently, Gorey et. al. conducted a systematic review of 21 human and animal studies to investigate whether age influenced the effects of cannabis on the brain, and found preliminary evidence that suggested it does. Further understanding the differences between how cannabis affects the adult brain versus the adolescent one could help us create better messaging and education for youth about how cannabis could affect them.  

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2 min read

Mosaic Group and Addiction Policy Forum Launch ‘Families Strong’

By Addiction Policy Forum on August 27, 2019

‘Families Strong’ support groups for families affected by addiction now available in six states

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2 min read

Why I am so excited about the Families Strong program

By Michelle Jaskulski on August 27, 2019

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4 min read

We have vaccines for polio and the flu, how about opioid addiction?

By Mark Gold, MD on August 22, 2019

Preliminary 2018 data from the Centers for Disease Control show a slight decline in drug overdose deaths.1 In the view of many experts, increased availability and use of Naloxone, education, and also increased access to Medication for Addiction Treatments (MAT) contributed to this decline.2 However, opioid use disorders and drug overdose rates remain extremely high nationally. Moreover, decreasing overdoses from prescription misuse and heroin should not distract from rising importation, misuse, and overdoses due to fentanyl, methamphetamine, and cocaine.3 With limited treatment options available for these substance use disorders, researchers are working to create novel approaches, using all technologies available, to prevent, treat, and improve the lives of patients and families. In a number of studies and trials, Tom Kosten and his colleagues at Baylor have looked at cocaine, methamphetamine, opioid and even fentanyl vaccines, showing promising results in reducing overdose, misuse, and treating substance use disorders.4 

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