Addiction Policy Forum Blog

2 min read

Changing the Culture Within Hospitals to Make the Biggest Impact

By Mark Powell on September 10, 2019

 
Continue Reading
6 min read

9 Life-Saving Addiction Programs In Oregon

By Kimberly Lohman Clapp on September 10, 2019

 

It’s true what they say, not all superheroes wear capes. Some of them hold a gavel, others carry stethoscopes , and one of them wore Olympic medals. Innovators across Oregon are saving the day through programs that are changing our response to addiction. In 2017, 530 Oregon residents died of a drug overdose. However, seemingly ordinary people are creating extraordinary programs and saving lives.

Continue Reading
2 min read

Joining Forces to Offer Hope

By Mark Powell on September 10, 2019

 

Like many states, Oregon is a patchwork quilt of big cities, small towns, and wide rural expanses. And like many other states, its rural regions haven’t been spared from the opioid crisis.

Continue Reading
2 min read

Transitioning to a Substance Free Life

By Mark Powell on September 10, 2019

 

It was just sitting there, a big vacant structure across the street from the Clackamas County Jail. For many years it had housed a local sheriff’s office precinct. Then on a cold day in February 2016, it began a new mission as the home of the Clackamas County Transition Center.

Continue Reading
2 min read

Recovery Resources as Unique as You

By Simone Greene on September 10, 2019

 

For a long time, women in Oregon who were both pregnant and fighting addiction were caught in a Catch-22. Addiction providers didn’t want to work with pregnant women because of potential complications. And maternity care providers didn’t want to work with women suffering from addiction because of lack of understanding and expertise in that area.

Continue Reading
2 min read

Nurturing Prenatal Care

By Mark Powell on September 10, 2019

 

For a long time, women in Oregon who were both pregnant and fighting addiction were caught in a Catch-22. Addiction providers didn’t want to work with pregnant women because of potential complications. And maternity care providers didn’t want to work with women suffering from addiction because of lack of understanding and expertise in that area.

Continue Reading