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Join us to be part of our anti-stigma initiative

The Addiction Policy Forum’s Anti-Stigma Initiative aims to test and deploy new anti-stigma interventions and resources for communities. The new initiative is designed to: 

  • Reduce addiction stigma, including stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination intent, 

  • Increase knowledge about addiction, 

  • Improve helping behaviors towards individuals with a substance use disorder, and

  • Identify levels of addiction stigma in a community to establish a baseline indicator. 

 

Addiction is one of the most stigmatized health conditions on earth and prevents people who are struggling from reaching out for help and isolates families affected by the disease who fear being judged by their communities. 

 

Twelve communities will be selected in 2023 to serve as anti-stigma pilot sites at no cost to the agency/jurisdiction. Year one of the project will include a pilot test of new anti-stigma interventions and deployment of a stigma survey. 

 

Who Should Apply?

  • States, Counties, Cities, Tribes

  • Community-Based Organizations

  • Treatment Providers

  • Criminal Justice Agencies

  • Employers 

  • Schools, Colleges, University 

  • Hospitals, Health Care Providers

  • Faith-Based Organizations

  • Professional Associations 

  • Other Community Organizations

Requirements

 

Any city, county, tribe, agency or organization in the U.S. can apply to become a pilot site for the anti-stigma initiative at no cost. Each applicant is required to test one of two stigma interventions with not less than 50 participants (delivery can be virtual or in-person). Pilot sites will also be asked to disseminate a stigma survey and collect responses from 50 individuals and assign a staff member to support the delivery and completion of projects within the nine months timeline. 

 

Take part in the anti-stigma initiative and help your organization or community deconstruct the stigma around substance use disorders.

 

 


 

About Stigma

 

Addiction is one of the most stigmatized health conditions on earth and prevents people who are struggling from reaching out for help and isolates families affected by the disease who fear being judged by their communities. While over 20 million people in the United States struggle with substance use disorders, nearly half of Americans don’t think that addiction is a disease. 


Recent research shows that more than 80% of Americans are unwilling to associate with friends, co-workers, or neighbors suffering from a substance use disorder. Stigma also leads to discrimination in a variety of settings, including health care, criminal justice, employment, child custody, and housing, and creates barriers to accessing evidence-informed treatment and harm reduction services. The public and many professionals continue to view SUDs as a moral failing, which reinforces discriminatory policies and practices and further isolates and deters those struggling from seeking help. 

 

  Committee on the Science of Changing Behavioral Health Social Norms, Board on Behavioral, Cognitive, and Sensory Sciences, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education, & National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. (2016). Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: The Evidence for Stigma Change. National Academies Press (US). https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK384915/

 

Room R. (2005). Stigma, social inequality and alcohol and drug use. Drug and alcohol review, 24(2), 143–155. https://doi.org/10.1080/09595230500102434

   Volkow, N. D. (2020). Addressing the Stigma that Surrounds Addiction. National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA). https://www.drugabuse.gov/about-nida/noras-blog/2020/04/addressing-stigma-surrounds-addiction

 

Tsai, A. C., Kiang, M. V., Barnett, M. L., Beletsky, L., Keyes, K. M., McGinty, E. E., Smith, L. R., Strathdee, S. A., Wakeman, S. E., & Venkataramani, A. S. (2019). Stigma as a fundamental hindrance to the United States opioid overdose crisis response. PLoS medicine, 16(11), e1002969. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pmed.1002969

 

National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; Health and Medicine Division; Board on Health Sciences Policy; Committee on Medication-Assisted Treatment for Opioid Use Disorder, Mancher, M., & Leshner, A. I. (Eds.). (2019). Medications for Opioid Use Disorder Save Lives. National Academies Press (US). https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30896911

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