Addiction Policy Forum Blog

6 min read

Can CBD be used to treat Angelman syndrome? Here’s what new UNC research says

By Mark Gold, MD on October 17, 2019

Cannabidiol (CBD) is a “phytocannabinoid” part of cannabis, or an element created from the cannabis plant. According to a recent New York Times article, “The CBD industry is flourishing, conservatively projected to hit $16 billion in the United States by 2025. Already, the plant extract is being added to cheeseburgers, toothpicks and breath sprays."1 The FDA has approved Epidiolex, a CBD oral solution, for prescriptions to patients two years of age and older to treat certain intense forms of epilepsy, Lennox-Gastaut syndrome or Dravet syndrome, marking the first official go-ahead for a marijuana-derived substance.2 CBD, in short, makes headlines. Yet some consumers buying a CBD product sold over-the-counter have had difficulty finding a label and knowing what they’re actually getting.3 For other potential consumers, the biggest questions aren’t about a buzzy new wellness trend—they’re about failing a drug test after acquiring impure CBD or THC in a purchase.4 

Consumers try to balance these fears with the purported benefits CBD. It is true that Epidiolex has been life-changing for the seizures associated with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and Dravet syndrome. For parents and children coping with these conditions, all other treatments have failed. CBD may have benefits for other patients with rare or difficult-to-treat neurological diseases. In a recent study, researchers at the University of North Carolina wondered if CBD might help treat individuals with another condition involving severe seizures, Angelman syndrome. 

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8 min read

Substance use disorders take a toll on more than just health

By Mark Gold, MD on October 10, 2019

Many Americans are aware of the United States’ current overdose and addiction epidemic. For patients, families, friends, and loved ones, the tragic health and behavioral effects of substance use disorders (SUDs) are readily recognizable at a level of intimate, granular detail. Among individuals who have used substances, not all have SUDS, but many have spent money on illicit substances. SUD-related discussions frequently focus on survival or addiction, sometimes looking past another elephant in the room: finance. A recent RAND report for the Office of National Drug Control Policy (ONDCP) sheds an important light on how much money we pay for illegal drugs by highlighting Americans’ expenditures on methamphetamine, marijuana, heroin, and cocaine.

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